Category Archives: SFFH

The Complete Marvel Dubsmash Conflict

So this is a compilation video of all the Dubsmash videos of the friendly competition between the cast of Marvel’s Agent Carter and Marvel: Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. that began as innocent fun during the 2015 San Diego ComicCon and blossomed into a voting competition for charity with prominent guest stars, that ended up raising over $125,000. It’s the power of the Internet, when it’s doing good and providing time-wasting entertainment where actors act like your old high school buddies. Enjoy!


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Musings on Some of my T.V. Shows (May Contain Spoilers)

Having risen from my gasping sick-bed, I can now comment on all the t.v. I watched while recovering:

Grimm: Juliet may not be dead! That would be cool, if so. Because Juliet is a great character, but the writers only occasionally write anything interesting for her. Otherwise, she tends to be in a coma or possessed/going crazy or warning Nick to be careful. And the way she seemed to go out was poorly done. I still love you show, but bring her back from the refrigeration and I’ll be a lot happier. In any case, the new players in the overarch plots seem interesting.

Walking Dead: Sorry, folks, but the only way that Glenn is actually alive is if that fall off the dumpster was a dream/concussion sequence. Which is possible, but with these writers, I suspect unlikely. Walkers were biting him on the shoulders. My progression with this show has been 1) found myself not able to watch it much despite some quality acting because the characters were too clueless to live; 2) decided I could watch it if I rooted for the walkers to kill them; 3) came to like some of the characters, who also had gotten (and their writers had gotten) a bit smarter and hoped they didn’t die maybe. And Glenn was one of those last, and the only Asian they have of course. Everybody knew eventually he’d go out (because comic books,) but I agree that wasn’t the perfect way for him to go out. But it was very much a Walking Dead way to go out — killed by stupidity.

Z Nation: George R.R. Martin as a zombie is one of my new favorite things.

Supernatural: You know I love you, show, but I’m calling it for this season: The Darkness is boring. Still a lot of fun writing in the individual episodes, but the problem with the super-ancient, super powerful big bads is that the writers then have to stall the whole season to get into battle with them. Sometimes that works for Supernatural (angels, yellow-eyed demon,) or sort of works (leviathans,) but this one is not working for me. You’re in your old age, show, could you not come up with something better?

Arrow: Nice use of Constantine, folks! That show had a number of problems before it was cancelled, but Matt Ryan playing John Constantine was not one of them. And so the folks at Arrow brought him back to reprise the character into Arrow’s universe. And he stole the show of course. He almost made the undercover in the island poppy fields flashback plot bearable. (Let’s wrap that flashback up, pretty please, Arrow?)

Sleepy Hollow: A crossover two-parter with the cast of non-speculative, forensic mystery show Bones? A hot mess, though the actors clearly had fun. We used to watch Bones but gradually stop when they became obsessed with having different sorts of serial killers trying to constantly kill the main characters. Went back to see the wedding episode and it looked like they were winding down. But they’ve stayed on and more power to them. But having Bones puncture mysteries, as she does, and having her universe actually be full of magic she’s missing was painful to watch. And what would have been a decent Sleepy Hollow Halloween episode with British soldier zombies just got awkward. So please don’t do that again. Otherwise, SH’s new season seems to be going fairly well, though at this point, I think we could do with less Betsy Ross flashbacks. It doesn’t make sense with the Crane going over to the rebels in part because of Katrina thing they already had. Also, I’m kind of hoping Crane’s new flame turns out to be evil, as she otherwise seems too much like the costume maker who had a crush on Crane and got killed for it.

Doctor Who: Happy with the return of Osgoode, and actually enjoying punk rocker, sunglass wearing Doctor as opposed to the early cranky old doctor routine, but what is with the continual two-part episodes? It’s getting a bit laborious.

Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.: I’m enjoying the season so far, but why are the writers obsessed with keeping FitzSimmons tortured and apart from each other? At this point, if they do any more of it, the two will just curl up into gibbering balls. We could use one romantic relationship that actually works on the show. (And no, Bobbi and Hunter don’t exactly work together.)

Also, the other television people: stop making more shows I want to watch. I have a life, you know. When I’m not coughing up a lung.


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Daniel José Older — Bone Street Rumba series and Shadowshaper

Daniel José Older debuted earlier this year with the first full-out novel in his contemporary fantasy Bone Street Rumba series, Half-Resurrection Blues. (Although he’s been of course editing and publishing short fiction, including some novellas set in the universe of Bone Street Rumba.)

Half-Resurrection Blues is about Carlos Delacruz, an in-betweener — a man who has died and been partially resurrected — who can’t remember his past identity, and who has found himself working for the NYC Council of the Dead as an investigator and hunter of ghosts and supernatural beings who are causing trouble between the realms of the living and the dead. (Think kind of Men in Black with ghosts instead of aliens.)

The complication is when the Council mysteriously sends him after a sorcerer trying to open the portal to the deadlands, and that man turns out to be another in-betweener, who may hold a link to Delacruz’s living past. The ripples from that encounter lead to an invasion of supernatural creatures who threaten Delacruz’s friends and to rip the veil between realms. And while he’s dealing with that, Delacruz has got to figure out the puzzle of his violent first death.

Older has a grand time setting up an interesting, cross-cultural supernatural system in the rapidly changing neighborhood of Brooklyn. His characters are sharp and fun, his dialogue really good and he does action scenes well. A lot of urban fantasy series fall back on the snarky. But while there’s a strong thread of humor running through the novel, like a strain of sugar in something tart, Half-Resurrection Blues is more meditative and bluesy, with tragic notes and elements that are horrific even when they are a bit funny. (Carlos also gets beaten up a lot, leaving him less time for zingers.) Carlos is truly a lost soul who has been treading water since his half-resurrection, and his discovery that he’s not the only in-betweener around wakes him up and makes him start figuring out who he wants to be in the half-life he’s caught in. Plus, he has to save the world and as many as he can, of course.

The main quibble I have is a common one for first novels in mystery thriller fantasy series like this. Namely, that the book has to focus on Carlos dealing with personal stuff in the main crisis and building his team of helpers for future stories. That means a bit less time than I would like on the details of the ghost aspects/system and the Council, and on the Brooklyn neighborhoods. Older does spend some time on the latter, but I used to live in that area, long before its many changes today, so that was a factor I enjoyed.

But I suspect that this is a series that is going to do well as people discover it. Older also launched a separate YA novel this year, called Shadowshaper:

That looks really interesting too. I’m very behind on reading YA titles, but I may check it out. Older is beloved by the cover gods, as you can also see by the cover of the second novel in the Bone Street Rumba series, coming out in January, Midnight Taxi Tango:

That’s a book that’s going to feature young Kia, who is basically going to be one of the favorite characters in the series of everybody, so I’m probably going to be checking that one out too.

You can check out Older’s website here. He’s also the co-editor, with Rose Fox, of the anthology Long Hidden: Speculative Fiction from the Margins of History, which has been getting a lot of raves and features yet another wonderful cover:

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Happy Birthday, George R.R. Martin!

Have some lovely golden presents:


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Puppying Down

During most of the Great Hugo Campaign That Wasn’t that spun out of the “hope we get the conservative media pundits interested” mess that were the Puppies, I was really busy, some good and some bad. I would talk about the situation in various spots when I had the chance, and it certainly made for a particular type of entertainment, but I wasn’t about to try to fully hop in. And now that the Hugos have been handed out for 2015 and the Puppies are trying to figure out how to keep things going while whining about the new Star Wars tie-in novel from Chuck Wendig having a gay protagonist, I’m not inclined to hash things out further. Not specifically about them any-hoo. The more general topic of discrimination, I have some things to say, when I can get to it.

But I do have some links I collected of other people writing about the whole Hugo thing that I thought were informative and cogent over the seven months of deep, deep puppy whining and spitting. So in case you missed them, you can peruse at your leisure:

First up are two pieces by author Kameron Hurley, one for The Atlantic on the situation, and one on her blog about Internet hyperbole re the situation.

Then, there is Amal El-Mohtars take on the Puppies.

Eric Flint, a liberal author who both publishes with and edits for Baen Books, broke apart the Puppies’ claims in this article and its sequel.

And Philip Sandifers angry cultural takedown of the Puppies, which got him his own nickname from them.

Sandy Ryalls on a blog at commented on the heart of the conflict.

Author K. Tempest Bradford pointed out unintended consequences from the Puppies’ assault on the Hugos.

Author Jim C. Hines took a close look at what the Puppies were actually saying.

M.D. Laclan at looks at the cultural timeline and how both past and future SF does not fit the Puppies’ narrative.

Author and screenwriter David Mack offers a detailed analysis of why Puppy nominee and participant Amanda Green’s essay on his Star Trek novel that she put in her Hugo Fan Writer nominee packet is full of hot air. (This fits with what Green is now trying to do with Chuck Wendig and what the Puppies tried to claim about Star Trek in general.)

Author Tobias Bucknell explains why the image of SFF fandom as a safe place free of attacks like the Puppies’ was always a myth.

Kevin Standlee explains how the Puppies’ mercantile demands show they don’t understand the nature of the Hugo Awards at all.

Carrie Cuinn and Aaron Pound both individually look at author and Puppy Hugo nominee Lou Antonelli’s illegal swatting attempt of WorldCon Guest of Honor David Gerrold and WorldCon itself.

Miles Schneiderman covered the whole debacle for

Cartoonist and writer Barry Deutsch looks at the up-coming Sad Puppies IV for next year and explains why it’s still a voting slate attempt.

And writer and game designer Alexandra Erin wrote several very intelligent pieces about the Puppies and also provided some brilliant satire during the whole ordeal:

“Sad Puppies Book Review: The Monster at the End of this Book”

“The Barker and the Big Tent”

“This Just In”

“Interview with a Pratt”

“Hugo Awards: Upset Fans Say No to Sad Puppies”

If you do wade through all that, do not despair in the end. The Hugo Awards are fine. And fandom isn’t any more split than it was before. It’s just now those divisions are a bit more out in the open, with the aid of Internet screaming. That’s not, necessarily, a bad thing, although it makes it a little tricky for the publishers. But they could use some shaking up, frankly. They are the ones who have produced a SFF field that is 90% white people, mostly writing about white people.


Filed under book publishing, SFFH

Awesome Frequently Asked Questions about Jurassic World

I’m at work on something right now, but in the meantime, I went to see Jurassic World. Which was fun, especially because it turned out to be a very crowded movie theater, which meant we had to sit in the third row of the theater. You know how you go to a lot of these 3D movies and the 3D doesn’t really add much to the experience if it’s not IMAX? Sometimes I don’t even go to the 3D version because it’s more expensive and really not worth it. But if you sit in like the third or fourth row? Much more effective 3D experience. Things really do jump out at you, which when you are watching a bunch of rampaging dinosaurs, is kind of neat. Stiff neck at the end, but neat.

Jurassic World was nowhere near as awful as Prometheus, Avatar and the utterly horrible The Expendables 2. It had some very funny moments and great action. The CGI and animatronix dinosaurs are still not quite real looking, but they are getting closer with each movie and they did it pretty effectively here. The actors, including the young ones, gave the best performances they could despite the awful script. Howard went for a total 1980’s look, which allows for discussions of retro fashion. There is an utterly horrible death of a minor character that goes on for a horribly long time, but is, gore aside, unquestionably a really creative death. There are many little tribute details to the first Jurassic Park movie, which reminds you that Jurassic Park, for its occasional faults, was a way better movie. And the movie did make me desperately want a robot raptor doll.

And Jake Johnson is in the movie and almost manages to save half of it. He should star in the inevitable sequel (because this movie has already hit a billion dollars.)

For a much better take on the movie than I could give you, here’s io9‘s article by Rob Bricken, entitled, “Jurassic World: The Spoiler FAQ.” It is awesome and sums up the movie nicely.


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Game of Thrones Gloriously Helps Out Red Nose Day Campaign

In case you didn’t get to see it/knew about it on the Internet, here’s the preview teaser and then whole video documentary of Game of Thrones, the musical, for fund-raising for the Red Nose Day campaign. I imagine views still help them out with revenue from YouTube and such, and believe me, it’s worth seeing.



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Filed under Humor, Movies/TV, SFFH, Social Equality