Tag Archives: comics

Wonder Woman and the Costume

Getting back in the saddle again, and one of the funnier things that happened when I was on hiatus was the release of photos from the supremely weird DC Comics movie venture, Batman v. Superman.

I have not had occasion to write about Wonder Woman for several years, largely because nothing much was happening with Wonder Woman. The television series was scrapped, the new look and new story version of Wonder Woman in the comics (the comfy pajamas look,) went bye-bye at the conclusion of that alternate universe idea, and she returned to an outfit that was a variation of the older version that also is in the animated stories, and got another slightly changed origin story. And of course, there was no Wonder Woman film on the horizon because it was “too hard” for them to do apparently.

Then came word that Wonder Woman might be in the possibly going to get made Justice League movie, DC’s attempt to build a Marvel-style multi-franchise. And then it was announced that she would have some sort of bit part in Batman vs. Superman, and be played by actress Gal Gadot. Shortly before and at the San Diego ComicCon, DC released some promotional stills that included the new movie Wonder Woman in her new costume.

What were they going to do? Would they go with the classic signature stars bathing suit, (which originally had a skirt that got shorter and shorter and then removed,) like they did in the t.v. show of the 1970’s? Would they put her in pants, like the comics attempted and they’d planned for the t.v. show? Would she have a full out unitard like Batman and Superman? Here’s what they went with:

gal-gadot-wonder-woman-news-sdcc1

That might seem a tad familiar:

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Yep, they made Wonder Woman into Xena: Warrior Princess. This is not entirely unfair, as the look and some parts of the character of Xena were loosely modeled after Wonder Woman (ancient Greco-Roman don’t you know,) but the similarities are quite striking. Wonder Woman now has, like Xena, a sword, over the knee boots, bracers on her arms instead of bracelets, a leather doublet, a skirt of leather strap panels, all turned a dark wine red color akin to Xena’s reddish brown outfit.

In other words, their solution to the not really a problem costume problem was to go with yet another generic (and still impractical) style of costume — the fantasy lady quest warrior. Other than that she still has the lasso attached to her hip, you’d be very hard press to know that this picture of Gal Gadot was Wonder Woman unless you were told, and not instead a photo of some new character for the next 300 film sequel.

The irony of course is that in keeping their rebooted Superman, Henry Cavill, who is firmly rooted in the modern world, and having an aged version of Batman, played by Ben Affleck, DC/Warner actually had some grounds for giving Wonder Woman one of the more contemporary looks to match them. Instead, they went pseudo-ancient, so perhaps Wonder Woman is popping in from another dimension to borrow a cup of sugar. And when she does, she’ll be just another generic if kick-ass female, not distinctive, iconic, her own person. Not red and blue and gold — because Superman wears red and blue. Not immediately recognizable, like Batman in his unchanging black cowl. Just a female in red leather with a sword who could have been called anything.

Here’s hoping that they don’t decide to cut her out of the movie altogether in the end. Because for the last 75 years of Wonder Woman history, she is apparently very, very scary just as herself.

wonderwoman_large

 

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Videos for a Rainy Friday Evening

My desk looks like a tube of paper exploded on it. So have some entertaining videos:

1) The wonderfully clever short film called Darth Baby’s Lightsaber. This is my new favorite Star Wars parody:

2) The amazing group Arstidir (close as I can get to reprinting properly,) sing an old Icelandic hymn in the stunning acoustics of a German train station:

3) Dan Newbie‘s rendering of the theme to Game of Thrones on water glasses, jugs and pans:

4) The trailer for the up-coming new t.v. show, Constantine, adapted from the comics and airing on NBC in the U.S., which looks pretty good:

5) The trailer for the new New Zealand mockumentary film about vampires, What We Do in the Shadows. I’m hoping it gets widely distributed:*    *Apparently, it’s not a film; it’s a t.v. series, which is even better.

6) And lastly, an amazing street performer reproduces Bumblebee from the Transformer movies in Michigan. I don’t know if this is the same guy as the one in New Orleans but it seems very likely, and I don’t know who he is but the special effects people in Hollywood should hire him:

 

 

 

 

 

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Links & Misc. — Spring Cleaning! — Part 3

Diversity & Ending Discrimination:

Because I can, ha ha! There are just a lot of these saved up, from various craziness that’s occurred in the last several months, and many folks have been writing interesting things. So I’m presenting the links all at once.

At Salon.com, Sara Eckel presents actual evidence that “Feminism Isn’t Ruining Your Love Life.”

Jim C. Hines deconstructed this bizarre rant from Larry Correia back in January. It is even more relevant now with Correia’s Hugo voting fun times. Correia attempts to accuse a writer at Tor.com who was encouraging other SFF writers to think outside the box regarding binary gender in their stories of actually demanding as a commandment that all should get rid of cisgender characters. Hines looks at each of Correia’s assumptions, misinterpretations, and misdirections.

The always interesting super fan Michi Trota explains the extent and damage of discrimination in geekdom in “No One Can Deny You Entry to Geekdom, but Some Can Make It Really Hard to Get Through the Door First.”

Astra Taylor looks at misogyny and inequality built into the Web and how we deal with the gender gaps.

Amanda Marcotte in an editorial at The Raw Story looks at “What Are Misogynist Geeks So Afraid Of.”

Comics maven Janelle Asselin talks about meeting this sort of misogyny firsthand when she dared to criticize a poorly done comics cover, and received rape and death threats.

Jonathan McIntosh writes about the difficulties in the gaming world with “Playing with Privilege: The Invisible Benefits of Gaming While Male.”

The Korra Is Not Tan blog does a nice little rundown of racism and sexism regarding attitudes towards superheroes.

Mark Chu-Carroll at Goodmath.org talks about misogyny in “The Horror, the Horror, How Dare We Discriminate Against Men by Listening to Women.”

Katherine Lampe talks about helping out her guy friends dealing with discrimination issues in “What’s a Good Guy to Do.”

An older piece from two years back that was brought to my attention — Dr. Sheila Addison expands on John Scalzi’s famous piece about privilege, “The Lowest Difficulty Setting.”

The Atlantic’s Ta-Nehisi Coates tackles recent racism controversies concerning Cliven Bundy and Donald Sterling in “This Town Needs A Better Class of Racist.”

PZ Myers, regarding the recent Hugo voting slate discussions, talks about how “But Silence is Political.”

Foz Meadows also tackles the subject for Huffington Post in her highly intelligent way, in “Politics Belong in Science Fiction.”

Daniel Jose Older writes at Buzzfeed.com what is perhaps one of the best pieces on discrimination and diversity I’ve seen in awhile, in “Diversity Is Not Enough.”

Most recently, Violet Baudelaire at Jezebel gives a really excellent explanation of what the term “privilege” means in an open letter to the idiot young white boy who calls himself the Princeton Kid. (But really, it isn’t his youth that’s the issue — we get this at all ages.)

And lastly, a very moving video in which the artist called Panti speaks after a play production about discrimination:

 

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A Little Cool Art

Comics and graphics artist Nate Hallinan has come up with an interesting series of artworks of the Marvel X-Men characters in an alternate, secondary world medievalish fantasy universe. It’s called, appropriately enough, Medieval X-Men: The Order of X.

Here is the one for Xavier. It looks very much like Patrick Stewart, who played Professor X in some of the X-Men films. The others, however, look rather different from their modern comics selves, with interesting results. He’s written up bios for these alternate characters. Definitely art worth checking out (he’s still working on the series.)

Nate Hallinan, Medieval X-Men

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Some Funnies for the Day

Supernatural new fall season promo:

A collage of Vime videos from a dad who will eventually be taken out by his wife — Batdad! :

Monty Python and The Holy Grail is one of the true classics of comedy film. But what if it weren’t sold as a comedy, but as a modern fantasy action thriller? A parody rejiggered trailer for the movie (Eric Idle of Python saw it and said that it was wonderful):

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The Play Was Excellent — Here’s Another Funny!

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Happy. Happy. Happy.

Joss Whedon rides again. And a t.v. show too!

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