Tag Archives: sexism

A Link to a Cool Magazine Issue with some Diversity Links (Dumping Days)

Back last summer, Lightspeed Magazine did a very cool issue of the magazine called “Women Destroy Science Fiction!” featuring stories from women SF writers and a lot of articles about women in science fiction and the issues female writers and fans face in the field. I meant to feature it at the time, but life happened. You can still check it out at the link above. There’s also a lovely Twitter feed “article” — becoming a new art form that — from SFF writer Seanan McGuire about what the issue of the magazine means to her as writer and fan.

Of course not everybody was able to get into the spirit of the thing. Old fashioned sexist Dave Truesdale, who apparently runs a site called Tangent Online, whined about the issue’s existence and assembled panels of others to “review” the issue’s non-fiction articles by whining about their existence. This irked a number of people into writing very fun articles about the issue and that critiquing site’s usual sexist commentary on the very idea of it, the kind of rhetoric heard all the way back by Mary Shelley when she published Frankenstein. Amal El MohtarE. Catherine ToblerJohn O’Neill of Black Gate Magazine, and Rachel Acks were the ones I found the most astute and Natalie Luhrs was both astute and offers up interesting related links.

On a similar front of encouragement and documenting discrimination, Gail Simone did a great piece for women creators in comics and women creators in general. My favorite quote from it:

“I have many times seen advice given to women that essentially equals, “smile and don’t upset anyone.” This is the world’s worst advice, and the people who say that to you? Make no mistake. They are the enemy, regardless of gender. Don’t even bother to engage them, just go around them as they try to grab your legs and pull you down.”

Bestselling fantasy author Carrie Vaughn also does a great piece about writing “tough” female characters and the stereotypes we socially hold about them.

And at Vox.com, Susannah Locke did a fascinating interview with scientist Sarah Richardson, author of the book Sex Itself: The Search for Male and Female in the Human Genome. The book tackles the actual facts about our biological sex regarding our DNA and Richardson talks about the social biases about gender that have skewed biological research and had to be deconstructed:

“Our biological theories of sex are deeply intertwined with our cultural theories of sex and gender.”

Good stuff, so check out what interests you.

 

 

 

 

 

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Diversity Issues Are An On-going Campaign

Normally after I’d done a mini-rant on how Wonder Woman is getting marginalized and washed down, I wouldn’t plop down another group of diversity writing links so soon after, but there’s been a lot happening this particular spring and summer, a lot of it deeply saddening. The good side is that a lot of people have been writing interesting pieces on the issues, pulling up stats and social research, explaining for the umpteenth time what privilege is — since people seem to have a very hard time understanding that not being discriminated against in the society for being in a demographic group is actually a privilege that has wide ranging effects. But since I was otherwise occupied, those pieces I thought worth looking at piled up. You may have seen some of these already, but they are here for your reference. This batch is from earlier in the year, plus one older one:

1) Soraya L. Chemaly looks at how women’s speech is suppressed and erased on an every day basis, starting in childhood, with lots of lovely links to research studies, in “10 Simple Words Every Girl Should Learn“.

2) David Mura adds some interesting thoughts in the wake of discussions over author Junot Diaz’s piece on MFA degrees regarding people of color, in “POV on the Response to Junot Diaz’s MFA Vs. POC“.

3) Anne Ursu on her blog looks at how women YA and children’s writers get erased and the issue of diversity problems in children’s/YA publishing in her piece called, “‘The John Green Effect’, Contemporary Realism and Form as a Political Act“.

4) Devin Faraci at BadAss Digest looks at the inequality towards female directors in Hollywood and film in “2002’s K-19 is the Most Expensive Live Action Film from a Female Director“.

5) Model View Culture‘s Editors penned “An Open Letter on Feminism in Tech” about sexism in the tech industry.

6) Todd Harper at Polygon talks about the suppression of diversity in games and the particular excuse that having diversity destroys enjoyment in “Erasing Your Audience Isn’t ‘Fun’“.

7) Vixy, a blogger, writes about the answers to the question “What am I supposed to do about it?” regarding discrimination in society, in “So What Am I Supposed to Do About It? #YesAllWomen“.

8) Arthur Chu writes at The Daily Beast about the sexist scripts male “nerds” are taught in “Your Princess is in Another Castle: Misogyny, Entitlement, and Nerds“.

9) Damien Walter at The Guardian talks about diversity in SFF and regarding awards issues in “Science Fiction’s Real-Life War of the Worlds“.

10) SorryWatch talks about sexism towards female athletes in “Wanted: #1-ranked Tennis Player, No Fatties“.

11) Andy Duncan has a brief word for pals complaining that there’s too much complaining about diversity in “Politics in SF, What Side Am I On?“.

12) And finally, one from 2012 that I was introduced to, by Doug Muder, on privilege, that I thought was very apt, “The Distress of the Privileged“.

 

 

 

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Filed under Life, SFFH, Women

Diversity Writings That Still Echo

Under a bit of a time crunch today, so I am offering up some links of writing I have found good and interesting on diversity and discrimination that came out earlier this year or previously.

People of color, women, and gays — who now have greater access to the centers of influence that ever before — are under pressure to be well-behaved when talking about their struggles. There is an expectation that we can talk about sins but no one must be identified as a sinner: newspapers love to describe words or deeds as “racially charged” even in those cases when it would be more honest to say “racist”; we agree that there is rampant misogyny, but misogynists are nowhere to be found; homophobia is a problem but no one is homophobic. One cumulative effect of this policed language is that when someone dares to point out something as obvious as white privilege, it is seen as unduly provocative. Marginalized voices in America have fewer and fewer avenues to speak plainly about what they suffer; the effect of this enforced civility is that those voices are falsified or blocked entirely from the discourse. — Teju Cole

Kelly Thompson, author, comics writer, and journalist, at the GoodComics blog did a seminal piece about diversity issues and sexism in the comics, for her column “She Has No Head,” entitled “No It’s Not Equal.” (Thompson just had her graphic novel The Girl Who Would Be King optioned for film.)

Foz Meadows did a blog post about exclusion of women as the default in female geekery.

A few months ago, journalist Jessica Valenti did a piece for the UK’s The Guardian about how the notion of a women’s confidence gap is a sham used to justify and continue excluding women from the fields of endeavor.

Liz Bourke did a piece last year for Tor.com that I find particularly relevant these days too, entitled “Sleeping with Monsters.”

The definitive overview on cover whitewashing from TheBookSmugglers.com — definitely one of the biggest problems facing fiction publishing, especially YA, and SFFH publishing.

Saeed Jones at Buzzfeed.com takes an illuminating survey of things that women writers are sick of hearing in interviews and events.

Owen Lloyd explains why the main arguments of the men’s rights movement are mainly false.

Macy Sto Domingo at ThoughtCatalog.com looks at white privilege based communication blocks.

At Salon.com, Soraya Chemaly tackles the sexual harassment of insisting women smile.

 

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I Love Every One of You Guys in the Video and All the People Who Put It Together

Thanks to author N.K. Jemisin for the link:

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