Tag Archives: Tor.com

Links & Misc. — Spring Cleaning! Part 1

So I had a lot of stuff pile up in the first part of the year that was like, “that’s interesting, I’ll look at it more closely later in the blog maybe,” and of course, that didn’t happen. Now that it’s finally spring in my part of the world, I’m just going to present the things I collected in blocks, and you all can see if there’s anything that interests you enough to click on.

Publishing & Writing Stuff:

Kathleen Sharp gives a full and factual accounting in Salon.com of what actually happened with Apple, Amazon and the development of the e-book market.

Jim C. Hines explains why chasing trends in writing fiction is a fool’s errand. (Authors do these pieces from time to time; many new authors are just absolutely sure it can’t be true. But it’s true; this is how fiction publishing works.)

Charlie Stross expands with more facts and thoughts on Jim’s article.

At Tor.com, Emily Asher-Perrin does an interesting analysis of how Ron Weasley’s character in the Harry Potter series is changed and negated in the film adaptations.

Kameron Hurley guest-blogged at Chuck Wendig’s blog, Terrible Minds, earlier in the year about “On Persistence and the Long Con of Being a Successful Writer”.

Michael J. Sullivan has useful marketing tips for fiction authors.

John Scalzi looks at reality involving award winning books.

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April Fools Humor

I spent April 1st in a chocolate chip cookie coma after a crazy weekend, but others were busy making really silly April Fool’s Day jokes. Top of the list in SFFH was John Scalzi and his publisher Tor. Two years ago, Scalzi created a book cover mock-up for an imaginary epic fantasy trilogy he was supposedly writing called Shadow War of the Night Dragons. This was such a success that he wrote an imaginary prologue for the imaginary first book of the imaginary trilogy, published on Tor.com and it got nominated for a Hugo for Best Short Story. Last year, Tor paid a cover artist to do three mockups of the imaginary manga comics editions of the imaginary trilogy.  So this year, they had to top themselves. Enter the runaway trainwreck of Shadow War of the Night Dragons — the Broadway musical, complete with an audio expose of the fall-out between Scalzi and his musical collaborators, Paul and Storm, a situation exposed by an article from Tor.com that Scalzi threatens to sue them over. You can check out the fun with these links:

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2013/04/shadow-war-musical-john-scalzi

http://whatever.scalzi.com/2013/04/01/addressing-the-rumors/

http://www.paulandstorm.com/songs/#shadowwar

Also:

Amazon Announces Purchase of English:

http://www.themillions.com/2013/04/amazon-announces-purchase-of-english.html

Brent Weeks is doing children’s books:

http://www.brentweeks.com/2013/03/brents-new-childrens-book/

And the Star Wars universe has a new series:

http://star-wars.suvudu.com/2013/04/star-wars-fiction-goes-full-tilt-del-rey-to-adapt-boba-fett-pinball.html

Hope everyone had a lovely day of humor and laughter!

 

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Diana Wynne Jones

I don’t like having to do a lot of obituary notices and I really hate this one: British fantasy author Diana Wynne Jones passed away this weekend after a long battle with lung cancer at the age of 76. Jones was a giant in the field, particularly in the world of childrens/YA where she was much loved.  A winner of numerous Carnegie Medals and Mythopoeic Awards, she was best known for her Chrestomanci books, Dogsbody, the Derkholm duology, the Dalemark series and Howl’s Moving Castle, which was turned into an animated movie nominated for an Academy Award. More to the point, she was funny, generous, smart and articulate — one of the best ambassadors we had for books.

Here are some accounts by writers who loved her:

http://journal.neilgaiman.com/2011/03/being-alive.html

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2011/03/remembering-diana-wynne-jones

More stars dimming. Let’s hope for a happier spring.

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